Two For Tuesdays: FREE 14-day Samples of Nature Made Vitamins and Free Music From Amazon

In last week’s Two for Tuesdays post, we talked about saving money on groceries and the Drug Store Game. Each topic surely has saved you some money already, if you tried either of them.

This week, we’re talking freebies. So, let’s get started.

#1

I got an email this morning from a person at Nature Made who gave me the following links for FREE 14-day supplies of various food supplements.
FREE sample of Nature Made vitamins
I’ve personally used Nature Made products and I can vouch for their efficacy, in general. I cannot speak to this new line, as, well, they’re new, so I haven’t had a chance to try them yet. But you can be sure I’ll get my free sample(s).

Multivitamin: http://shortn.it/uT5t
Multivitamin for her: http://shortn.it/uTCu
Vitamin C: http://shortn.it/ykl8
Vitamin D: http://shortn.it/g7SV
Calcium: http://shortn.it/oaL7
Super B Complex: http://shortn.it/GvmG

#2Amazon Music Downloads

Everybody likes free, especially music. With the going rate of 99 cents per song, buying a lot of music on iTunes can really deplete your disposable income. It’s also very difficult to find new, good music. Do you pay the buck for an unknown (oh, sure, you can listen to a 30-second clip) or do you not buy at all?

I have an extensive collection of LPs and CDs and finding good new music is hard to come by. There are two places, however, where you can get full songs from (sometimes) reputable artists or up-and-comers, for free. One place is iTunes.

Load up your iTunes software on Tuesday and find the free song. Apple also offers free videos.

But my new favorite, for 3 reasons that I’ll explain shortly, is Amazon. Go here for this week’s free songs. There are 8 songs there, free for the taking.

Here’s why I really like Amazon’s music downloads:

  1. The files you download are mp3, a ubiquitous music file format that can play on any “iPod-like” device
  2. The files, by their mp3 nature, are unencumbered by Digital Rights Management (DRM), which means that you can load them on multiple devices
  3. The files are encoded at 256 kbps, rather than the somewhat “standard” 128 bitrate. This means bigger file sizes (not good, but in today’s cheap media storage environment, it matters less) and better audio quality

That’s it for this week. Stay tuned for next week’s Two For Tuesdays, where I’ll give you two more ideas on saving some of your hard-earned money.

billspaced

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